Sushi bolle

SUSHI BOWL

Raw halibut and salmon together in a delicious combination.

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Steamed halibut

CLASSIC STEAMED ATLANTIC HALIBUT

For this dish, we use thick fillets of Atlantic halibut that can be cut into equal portions.

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Halibut and prawns on a skewer

HALIBUT AND PRAWNS ON A SKEWER

Grilled Atlantic halibut - easy to prepare and tasty to eat in the summertime.

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Maki bredde

MAKI ROLLS

With salmon, halibut and shrimps you can make delicious maki rolls.

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Oven Baked Halibut

OVEN-BAKED ATLANTIC HALIBUT, PEPPER STYLE

Oven-baked halibut gives jucy meat.

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Poached halibut

POACHED ATLANTIC HALIBUT WITH SPRING VEGETABLES

For this dish, we use thick boneless fillets that can be cut in equal sizes. The thickness is important in order to maintain the juiciness during poaching.

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Kveite til jullarge

HALIBUT FOR CHRISTMAS

Serve delicious roasted halibut with great accessories for your guests at Christmas. Serve with a puree of almond and a tasty butter sauce with white wine.

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Steamed Nordic Halibut by Chef JImmy Chok

STEAMED NORDIC HALIBUT

Enjoy this wonderful Asian take on steamed halibut with ginger, soya sauce, coriander and garlic oil. Not to mention some red chilli.

Recipe created for Nordic Halibut by Singaporean Chef Jimmy Chok.

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Pan-fried Nordic Halibut by Chef JImmy Chok

PAN-FRIED NORDIC HALIBUT

Delight your senses with pan-fried Atlantic halibut and som tam salad. 
Recipe created for Nordic Halibut by Singaporean Chef Jimmy Chok.

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Helleristining

THE HISTORY OF HALIBUT

Atlantic halibut has a unique history in Norwegian culture that goes back thousands of years. Ancient Nordic myths and legends reflect the extraordinary status and importance the inhabitants of the Norwegian coast attributed to the white halibut throughout the ages. As early as 6000 years ago, during the Stone Age, halibut had been elevated to a high status. We find images of halibut carved into rock walls in Norway (probably to bring good fortune to fishing expeditions), together with carved images of other significant prey on land and at sea - elk, reindeer, bear and whale. Images of halibut are so numerous that we must see this as a clear indication of its status as the grandest of all fish - the only saltwater fish to be invoked and worshipped by our ancestors.

 

Some stories

It is an indisputable fact that really good halibut fishing luck was only attainable through women. "Happy is the man who has a woman who can bring him good fishing luck the night before." This entailed that a wise fisherman should reserve the night before he went out to sea for pleasures of lovemaking. If he didn't catch a white halibut after that, it could cast doubts on the honour of both the man and the woman. And be warned: no one should believe that the connection between a romantic evening and good fishing luck is only a myth!

In the old days, it was well known that the halibut had a gentle, friendly personality, and fishermen could tell of experiences suggesting that the fish was very wise. Indeed, it could give good advice, which brought success and happiness when followed. Therefore, it is smart to heed the advice that comes from a full-grown halibut.

Like all other fish in the righteye flounder family, white halibut also have an asymmetrical mouth. An old legend explains how it got it. Once upon a time, the Virgin Mary was walking on the beach when she chanced upon a white halibut in the sea. She thought this fish vas very beautiful and told it so. This pleased the halibut very much, so much, in fact, that it became arrogant and began mimicking the chaste Virgin Mary. As a punishment, the white halibut has had an asymmetrical mouth ever since.

In 1670, the Norwegian clergyman, Petter Dass, wrote a long poem honouring this exclusive Norwegian fish and acknowledging that white halibut was the best seafood to serve on special occasions. He wrote: "You know full well it's the tastiest fish, with which Our Lord can cover our dish, And hopefully grace our table. A dish that lives up to its fame all the way, Can be served on a tray to wise men and lay, Whom it will please to not end."

 

 

 

Text: NSEC